Travel Health Zone - The effects of Dehydration & Salt Loss

home The travel health website for travellers
tours & transferstravel healthvisa informationoverland traveltravel shop
contact Uncover the Worldhelp & questionssearch Uncover the World websitee-mail this pageUncover the World network
Home > Water > The effects of Dehydration & Salt Loss
home


BEFORE YOU GO

>
Country List

>
Scuba Diving

>
Fear of Flying

>
Immunisations

>
Packing Drugs

WHILE ABROAD

>
Malaria

>
Food & Drink

>
Blood

>
Diarrhoea

>
Water

>
Altitude

>
Infant Safety

>
More Articles

BACK HOME

>
Check up?

COMMERCIAL

>
Directory

GENERAL

>
Ask the Doctor

>
Newsletter

OUR TOURS

>
Adventure Holidays

>
Egypt Tours

>
Jordan Tours

>
Nepal Tours

>
Bhutan Tours

>
Tibet Tours

>
Thailand Tours

>
Fishing Holidays

>
Cleaning Services


The effects of Dehydration

If fluid is not constantly replaced the effects of dehydration can be very serious and if the surrounding temperature is high, symptoms can be experienced very quickly indeed. By just sitting in the sun at 38oC you will perspire water at a rate of about 1 litre per hour and in only a few hours you will begin to experience the symptoms of dehydration as detailed below.

Water Loss (Average) Symptoms
1-5%
(0.5-2.5 litres)
Thirst, lethargy, irritability, loss of appetite, flushing of skin, increasing pulse, nausea and weakness.
6-10%
(3-5 litres)
Headaches, dizziness, dry mouth, tingling in limbs, blue shading of skin, slurring of speech, difficulty in breathing, stumbling and blurring of vision.
11-15%
(3.5-7.5 litres)
Delirium, swelling of tongue, twitching, deafness, dimming of vision, numbness and shrivelling of skin, difficulty in swallowing and death.


The effects of Salt Loss

When visiting hot countries the consumption of water rises relative to the surrounding temperature and with it also brings the possibility of mineral loss and in particular salt, through excessive sweating. Salt is vital in the removal of waste products and toxins from the body and in the transmission of nervous signals to and from the brain. The first signs of salt deficiency are headaches, muscle cramps and tiredness and usually become apparent after a couple of days of reduced salt intake. Should you develop symptoms of salt deficiency it is vital take in salt and if done so symptoms will disappear almost immediately. The best way to replace salt is to drink cups of slightly salty water and in fact when suffering from salt deficiency salty water will not taste salty so continue drinking it until it does. The drinking of oral rehydration solution is also a good way to rebalance salt levels but avoid salt tablets as it is easy to take too much without noticing and this can cause vomiting and nausea. The best way to avoid salt deficiency is to sprinkle salt on your food whenever possible and to avoid heavy physical activity in the heat of the day.


PREVIOUS PAGE    NEXT PAGE


first48
Information published on this website is not a substitute for professional medical care or advice but should be used only as an aid in understanding current medical knowledge. A Doctor should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition.

terms of usedotprivacy policydotaffiliates and jobsdotabout Uncover the World
Copyright © 2009 Uncover the World Limited. All rights reserved. Contact the webmaster. All maps & flags copyright © Uncover the World.